Fuck Yeah Domesticity
Making a home is an ART and as such, it should be celebrated. So this is a celebration of all things domestic:

Cooking, gardening, decor, knitting, baking, cleaning, crocheting, sewing, and generally creating a nurturing and enriching home environment!
Fuck Yeah Domesticity
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greedygardener:

A selection of some of the salad leaves I’ve been experimenting with. Clockwise from top left: golden purslane, red frills mustard, red veined sorrel, Greek cress and ice plant. The ice plant in particular has struggled in a water logged bed, but they’ve all proved really tasty.  The ice plant and purslane are very mild in flavour but have a pleasing succulent crunchiness that makes a good foil for the stronger flavoured cress, sorrel and mustard, or other leaves like rocket and mizuna.
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kissingunderspiderwebs:

this is the nut, honey and date cake we make for both solstices (Litha and Yule) #fromourkitchen #cake #solstice #summer #secularpagan #litha (Taken with Instagram at Bradstreet Home & Garden)
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americastestkitchen:

Secrets to Blueberry Cobbler
How do you make the two components come together in perfect harmony? Bake them separately. Get the step-by-step instructions here.
americastestkitchen:

Secrets to Blueberry Cobbler
How do you make the two components come together in perfect harmony? Bake them separately. Get the step-by-step instructions here.
americastestkitchen:

Secrets to Blueberry Cobbler
How do you make the two components come together in perfect harmony? Bake them separately. Get the step-by-step instructions here.
americastestkitchen:

Secrets to Blueberry Cobbler
How do you make the two components come together in perfect harmony? Bake them separately. Get the step-by-step instructions here.
americastestkitchen:

Secrets to Blueberry Cobbler
How do you make the two components come together in perfect harmony? Bake them separately. Get the step-by-step instructions here.
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feedingmyboychick:

First beet harvest.
I have no idea how to tell when to harvest beets? Like, the greens are huge. I can see some beet root at ground level. Um… Done? Not done? Tiny? Small but useable? Overgrown? I remain clueless.
These were the biggest I saw, and as small as I’d want to use, so I guess the rest are sticking in the ground a bit longer.
But they’re awfully pretty.
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proper-dave:

Chooks on Flickr.
Up at the Sunbury farm, you can almost see the reptilian cunning in them.
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nycgonnagogo:

farmwork by *ale valdivia* on Flickr.
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greedygardener:

This is the first year that we’ve had the whole allotment in production as well as the garden, so there’s been a bit of rearranging going on. The four main beds in the back garden are now mainly given over to salad leaves and herbs like parsley and coriander that I use all the time for convenience. These multicoloured leaves are grown in strips as cut and come again - I should get three or four cuts from each strip before I pull them up and resow. There’s another bed with similar contents I sowed last weekend so I’m hoping with those plus the terraced lettuce bed, I should have a succession of different salad right through to the autumn.
From left to right, Moroccan cress, Greek cress, Mizuna, Giant Red Mustard, Golden Streaks mustard, red sorrel, rocket and wild rocket. All these are brassicas and so need rotating to avoid club root which is why I’ve kept them separate from other leaves like claytonia, lettuce and purslane. There are various interlopers that have self seeded from last year, mainly nasturtiums and borage, so I’ve weeded some of them out but left the ones round the edges as they are beautiful and tasty but I don’t want them drowning out the salad - borage can grow taller than me.
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greedygardener:

I’ve been pleasantly surprised at the progress of my globe artichoke. Despite the very English weather so far this spring, this Mediterranean plant is already nearly as tall as me and has about half a dozen buds forming. I think this is partly down to the very mild winter as it stayed green throughout. The previous winter, a shop bought plant was completely annihilated by the long cold spell we had. When the leaves died down with the first frost, I carefully covered it with straw as protection but once the ground thawed and the snow finally melted two months later, it had disappeared completely. I love the architectural quality of artichokes so I grew this from seed and was amazed to be able to harvest a crop from it in its first year. As it did so well last year and seems to flourish in the dry, stony soil that I get in parts of my allotment, I thought I’d grow a few more. The variety is violetto precoce from the Italian seed company Franchi.
Artichokes are fiddly to prepare but very tasty and being so fresh, mine were especially tender. I gently poached them in wine, lemon juice and olive oil and they were delicious. We’re off to Spain on Sunday were I expect to see lots of these vegetables in the market and growing like weeds at the edges of fields. Fresh artichokes are so expensive here, the first time I cooked them was on another Spanish holiday. I wasn’t quite sure what to do with them but found a cookbook in the house we had rented. Unfortunately, the cookbook was in Danish, like the house’s owners, and the labourious process of preparing the artichokes was made even lengthier by having to translate the instructions with the use of a Danish/Spanish then a Spanish/English dictionary. Dinner was rather late that evening, I recall.
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americastestkitchen:

3 Tips for Peach Perfection
1. Pit a peach with ease. Locate the crease that marks the pointed edge of the pit. Position the knife at a 90 degree angle to the crease and cut the fruit in half, pole to pole. Twist the halves of the fruit apart and pull out the pit.
2. Cut a peach and you’ll see dark red flesh surrounding the pit. It’s bitter, so scoop it out of your cut peaches for a sweeter peach flavor.
3. Don’t refrigerate peaches unless you’re sure they’re ripe -– peaches that spend time in the fridge are significantly mealier than those left to soften at room temperature.
Now go on and make these Peach Shortcakes!
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elevenhills:

This artyarn “Treasure Hunt” is now available in my store: http://etsy.me/xnaO8i
elevenhills:

This artyarn “Treasure Hunt” is now available in my store: http://etsy.me/xnaO8i
elevenhills:

This artyarn “Treasure Hunt” is now available in my store: http://etsy.me/xnaO8i
elevenhills:

This artyarn “Treasure Hunt” is now available in my store: http://etsy.me/xnaO8i
elevenhills:

This artyarn “Treasure Hunt” is now available in my store: http://etsy.me/xnaO8i
elevenhills:

This artyarn “Treasure Hunt” is now available in my store: http://etsy.me/xnaO8i